Posted in Style

Clotheswhores


BODY { BORDER-RIGHT: 0px; BORDER-TOP: 0px; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; MARGIN: 4% 10%; BORDER-LEFT: 0px; DIRECTION: ltr; LINE-HEIGHT: 1.2; BORDER-BOTTOM: 0px; FONT-FAMILY: verdana; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff } TABLE { FONT-SIZE: 10pt }

I think I have mentioned the penchant I had for dressing like a baby streetwalker in my late teens, yes?  Yes.  Well, between Hottie Fired Banker’s cleavage and Miley Cyrus’ crotch, I’ve been thinking a lot about clothes and what they mean lately.

All of us judge books by their covers.  Most of our initial attractions and reactions to people have everything to do with the way those people look.  When the scruffy looking guy on the corner starts walking to my car, I assume he is going to ask for money because my experience tells me that scruffy looking guys on corners are frequently panhandlers.  When the man with the frosted tips and Ed Hardy shirt approaches, I expect him to be unsavory and full of himself.  I expect the cute girl with the plum colored hair and nose ring to be able to tell me the hottest indie bands.  I expect the beefy guy in the hockey jersey to know sports.  I expect the girl with the Dior bag and Pucci shift to know fashion.  I expect the bleach blonde with the crunchy perm and tube top to sing some white trash version of Shania karaoke

I expect these things in the same way I expect a uniformed police officer to protect and serve, a uniformed fire fighter to fight fires, a uniformed soldier to know how to put together a rifle.  I expect these things in the same way I expect a WalMart greeter to greet, a Starbucks barista to barist, or a black bedecked Toni & Guy stylist to know how to razor cut.

It is wrong, of course.  Uniforms tell you what someone is paid to do, so the expectation is fair.  You expect someone who is hired to do a job, to be able to do it.  Personal clothing choices may only tell you what was the last thing clean on laundry day, but the expectations still exist.  That you would select a particular item of clothing from all the available options speaks to your likes, and your likes speak to your dislikes, and with strong enough choices, one shirt can speak of you as a perceived whole.  (Which is why my mother would never let me wear slogan t-shirts.)

Our sartorial choices tell a story.  Our style places us.  Our clothing gives a Cliff’s Notes version of who we are.  (Anyone who ever tried to pass a college course on The Divine Comedy using Cliff’s Notes knows exactly how ineffective those can be.  Don’t ask me how I know.  I got a D, all right?)  And I write that to make the next statement:

I have said before in Arwen’s blog, regarding professional dress codes, that no matter how unprofessionally a coworker dresses, your responsibility is to remain professional in your response to the coworker.  There are acceptable and unacceptable ways of reacting to the looks and attire of the people around us.  You don’t get to make an ass of yourself just because you can see half of someone elses.   

No matter what our fashion-based expectations are, there are standards of conduct to which we must hold ourselves. 

For example, no matter how much like Julia Roberts in the opening scene of Pretty Woman a girl might look, she is not "asking for it".  (Unless a woman actually "asks you for it", you should assume that she does not want "it".)

My response to Bai Ling’s states of undress, to Travis Barker’s tattoos, to Taylor Swift’s sequins will tell you a lot more about me than Bai’s exposed nipples will ever tell you about her.

I invite you to watch me on that wise. 

 


 

Advertisements

Author:

Happy. That about covers it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s